Renee Schwartz to Help Connect Practical Arts to Main Lesson

Brining New Project Ideas and Hands On Learning

Renee Schwartz, Waldorf Practical Arts Teacher Training

Renee Schwartz is an Experienced Curriculum Consultant specializing in progressive education. Trained in Steiner/Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia approaches, she has received a B.A. in Philosophy from Smith College and an M.S. in Curriculum & Instruction from McDaniel College with a focus on Action Research in the classroom.  You can read more about Reneeā€™s work here: waldorfcurriculum.com and switzerite.blogspot.com.

I dare you, yes dare you, to find a Waldorf block that Renee cannot speak of from the top of her head and offer you an idea or resource that is new to you. She has just that kind of breadth and knowledge behind everything she does.

Barbara Albert, Practical Arts Teacher

After having read Renee’s extensive blog and website for years, what a surprise it was to meet her at a training session last summer! Rarely have I met someone who understands so deeply the way that the Waldorf curriculum spirals and weaves through the years. Plus since she is willing to tell you everything she knows (and publishes it a waldorfcurriculum.com) you’ll learn a lot from her, too.

Register for Wool Wood Wax so you won’t miss a minute of what Renee has to say.

Then make yourself a cup of tea and take a look at these posts from her blog, switzerite.blogspot.com and website.

  • Photos from Fables Camp should give you plenty of good ideas for your handwork classroom.
  • You can find a link to the third grade training manual for the African Waldorf Teacher Development Program on this page of Renee’s website. I used it just this week as a story for some pottery/sculpture work. I use this as a story resource for 3rd and up.
  • This post on the Four Elements got me thinking. Renee suggests this as a fun summer camp. Even though it is a first grade block, what if my middle school woodworking classes touched on it again? Are forest fires necessary? How does wood form in the wind? How do trees communicate through the soil? What happens when wood is wet?

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